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The World Seen From Rome
Updated: 31 min 25 sec ago

Chile Looks Forward to Pope Francis’ Visit

Thu, 01/04/2018 - 2:50 AM

Pope Francis’ first international trip of the New Year will take place in less than two weeks. From January 15-18 the Holy Father will visit Chile, first stage of his itinerary, before going on to Peru, until the 22nd.

To reduce the costs of the trip, Pope Francis requested that useless expenses be avoided, using recycled materials and goods, said the Executive Director of Pope Francis’ visit, Javier Peralta, to the Chilean newspaper T13.

Therefore, the Pope’s request has been followed up, predisposing installations, such as altars, which can be used in other circumstances. According to T13, the altars alone will occupy a surface of 4,500 square meters; 600,000 hosts will be prepared for the faithful’s Communion.

The costs of the visit will be shared between the Catholic Church and the Chilean State, which will be in charge of the financial burdens for the Holy Father’s safety and the Pontiff’s meetings with the Authorities.

T13 reported that the total expenses foreseen will amount to four million pesos, 42% for the events in Santiago, 28% for the Mass at Iquique, 22% for the visit to Temuco, 5% for stipends and 3% for structural costs. Eventual surpluses will be donated to non-profit organizations that aid immigrants. Caritas-Chile and the Vatican selected the beneficiaries.

* * *

Apostolic Trip of the Holy Father 

The program of the upcoming apostolic trip of His Holiness Francis was published on 13 November. The following is the updated version:

CHILE Monday 15 January 2018
ROMA-SANTIAGO
08:00 Departure by air from Rome – Fiumicino for Santiago 20:10 Arrival at Santiago International Airport WELCOME CEREMONY 21:00 Arrival of the Holy Father at the Apostolic Nunciature Tuesday 16 January 2018
SANTIAGO
08:20 MEETING with the AUTHORITIES, with CIVIL SOCIETY and with the DIPLOMATIC CORPS in the Palacio de la Moneda Address of the
Holy Father
09:00 COURTESY VISIT TO THE PRESIDENT in the Salon Azul of the Palacio de la Moneda 10:30 HOLY MASS in Parque O’Higgins Homily of the
Holy Father
16:00 Brief VISIT to the SANTIAGO WOMEN’S PRISON Greeting of the
Holy Father
17:15 MEETING WITH PRIESTS, MEN AND WOMEN RELIGIOUS, CONSECRATED PERSONS AND SEMINARIANS in the Cathedral of Santiago Address of the
Holy Father
18:15 MEETING WITH THE BISHOPS in the Sacristy of the Cathedral Greeting of the
Holy Father
19:15 PRIVATE VISIT TO THE SHRINE of Saint Alberto Hurtado, SJ Private meeting with the priests of the Society of Jesus

 

Wednesday 17 January 2018
SANTIAGO-TEMUCO-SANTIAGO
08:00 Departure by air from Santiago Airport for Temuco 10:30 HOLY MASS in the Airport of Maquehue Homily of the
Holy Father
12:45 Lunch with some inhabitants of Aracaunia in the “Madre de la Santa Cruz” House 15:30 Departure by air from Temuco Airport for Santiago 17:00 Arrival at Santiago Airport 17:30 MEETING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE in the Shrine of Maipu Address of the
Holy Father
18:30 Transfer in closed vehicle to the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile 19:00 VISIT TO THE PONTIFICAL CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF CHILE Address of the
Holy Father

 

Thursday 18 January 2018
SANTIAGO-IQUIQUE-LIMA
08:05 Departure by air from Santiago Airport for Iquique 10:35 Arrival at Iquique International Airport 11:30 HOLY MASS at the Campus Lobito Homily of the
Holy Father
14:00 Lunch with the Papal Entourage in the “Casa de retiros del Santuario Nuestra Señora de Lourdes” of the Oblate Fathers 16:45 Arrival at Iquique Airport FAREWELL CEREMONY 17:05 Departure by air from Iquique for Lima

 

PERU Thursday 18 January 2018
SANTIAGO-IQUIQUE-LIMA
17:20 Arrival at Lima Airport
WELCOME CEREMONY Friday 19 January 2018
LIMA-PUERTO MALDONADO-LIMA
08:30 Departure by air from Lima for Puerto Maldonado Address of the
Holy Father
10.15 Arrival at the airport of Puerto Maldonado 10:30 MEETING WITH PEOPLES OF AMAZONIA in the Coliseo Regional Madre de Dios Address of the
Holy Father
11:30 MEETING WITH THE PEOPLE at the Jorge Basadre Institute Greeting of the
Holy Father
12:15 VISIT to the HOGAR PRINCIPITO Greeting of the
Holy Father
13:15 Lunch with representatives of the peoples of Amazonia in the ApaktonePastoral Centre 14:35 Departure by air for Lima 16:10 Arrival at Lima Airport 16.20 Visit to the Air Base Chapel 16.45 MEETING WITH THE AUTHORITIES, with CIVIL SOCIETY and with the DIPLOMATIC CORPS in the Courtyard of Honour of the Palacio de Gobierno 17.15 COURTESY VISIT TO THE PRESIDENT in the Hall of the Ambassadors of the Palacio de Gobierno 17:55 Private meeting with members of the Society of Jesus in the Church of San Pedro Saturday 20 January 2018
LIMA-TRUJILLO-LIMA
07:40 Departure by air for Trujillo 09:10 Arrival at Trujillo Airport 10:00 HOLY MASS on the coastal promenade of Huanchaco Homily of the
Holy Father
12:15 Tour by popemobile of the “Buenos Aires” quarter 15:00 Brief visit to the Cathedral 15:30 MEETING WITH PRIESTS, MEN AND WOMEN RELIGIOUS, SEMINARIANS OF THE ECCLESIASTICAL CIRCUMSCRIPTION OF THE NORTH OF PERU in the Colegio Seminario SS. Carlos y Marcelo Address of the
Holy Father
16:45 MARIAN CELEBRATION – VIRGEN DE LA PUERTA in Plaza de Armas Address of the
Holy Father
18:15 Departure by air for Lima 19:40 Arrival at Lima Airport Sunday 21 January 2018
LIMA-ROMA
09:15 TERCE PRAYER WITH THE WOMEN RELIGIOUS OF CONTEMPLATIVE LIFE in the Shrine of the Señor de los Milagros Homily of the
Holy Father
10:30 PRAYER TO THE RELICS OF THE PERUVIAN SAINTS in the Cathedral of Lima Prayer of the
Holy Father
10:50 MEETING WITH BISHOPS in the Episcopal Residence Address of the
Holy Father
12:00 ANGELUS in Plaza de Armas Angelus of the
Holy Father
12:30 Lunch with the Papal Entourage in the Apostolic Nunciature 16:15 HOLY MASS in the “Las Palmas” Air Base Homily of the
Holy Father
18:30 Arrival at the airport FAREWELL CEREMONY 18:45 Departure by air for Rome – Ciampino Monday 22 January 2018
ROME
14:15 Arrival at Rome – Ciampino Airport

JF

We Are Sinners

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 5:12 PM
General Audience: Pope: ‘Let’s Acknowledge We Have Sinned’

Official Summary of the Catechesis — Jan. 3, 2018

‘Draw Near in Prayer to Christ,’ Urges Pope

Greeting English Speakers, Pope Urges Faithful to Cherish the Joy of the Christmas Season

Pope’s New Year’s Advice to Young, Newlyweds, and Sick

Tells Young People to Be Messengers of Christ’s Love Among Their Peers

Pope: ‘Repenting Makes Us Prepare Inwardly, Worthy to Celebrate Holy Mystery’

Reminds Arabic-speaking Pilgrims That Humble Sincere Confession Restores Union Again With God

GENERAL AUDIENCE : On the Penitential Rite (FULL TEXT)

‘We Must Tell Our Sins’

Like Protagonists in the Bible, Let Divine Mercy Transform & Convert You

Reflecting on Penitential Rite at General Audience, Francis Reminds the Importance of Not Pointing Fingers

Poland: Pope Wishes the Country a Time of Peace and Hope

New Year’s Greetings at the General Audience

Pope Tweets Peace Possibility

‘In the Name of Jesus’

Pope Names Three New Bishops

Brazil, Ireland, Spain

Midnight Mass in Mosul

First Service in More Than Three Years

Midnight Mass in Mosul

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 2:38 PM

The bells rang out in Mosul for the first time in more than three years when a church in Iraq’s second city opened its doors for Christmas Midnight Mass.

Up to the last minute, plans for the service at Mar Pulse Church in Mosul’s Al-Mundshen suburb hung in the balance – until a group of young Muslims helped clean the church and make it ready – including erecting the cross, according to Aid in the Church in Need (ACN).

About 400 families – up to 2,000 people – attended the service, traveling to Mosul from displacement camps near Erbil, the capital of Kurdish northern Iraq.

It is still unsafe for Christians to go back and live in Mosul, which was only liberated from Daesh (ISIS) – although there are reports of a few families going back, ACN reported.

Presiding at the Mass was Chaldean Catholic Patriarch Louis Raphael I Sako of Baghdad.

In a sign of growing ecumenical relations, also taking part was Syriac Catholic Archbishop Butros Moshe of Mosul and in attendance was Syriac Orthodox Archbishop Nicodemus Douad of Mosul.

Muslim representatives were also present at the service, which went ahead amid high security.

Father Najeeb Michaeel, who also took part in the Mass, said: “Let us hope that the light of Jesus may shine in their hearts and bring light to our wounded world.”

When Mosul was taken by Daesh in June 2014, almost all of the city’s Christians left after Daesh gave them an ultimatum of either converting to Islam or being killed.

For the first time in almost 1,800 years, no Mass was celebrated in the city.

Daesh seized Christian homes, marking them with an Arabic ‘n’ symbol denoting ‘Nazarene’ – Christian.

With Daesh now flushed out of Iraq, Aid to the Church in Need is committed to helping Christians return to their towns and villages, rebuilding homes and other vital structures which were badly damaged during the Islamists’ occupation.

ACN’s work has helped stem the exodus of Christians from Iraq, with numbers reportedly now down to below 250,000.

 

JF

Pope Names Three New Bishops

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 1:33 PM

Pope Francis on January 3, 2017 appointed three new bishops:

  • As bishop of the diocese of Getafe, Spain, Bishop Ginés Ramón García Beltrán, transferring him from the see of Guadix.
  • As bishop of the diocese of Petrolina, Brazil, Bishop Francisco Canindé Palhano, transferring him from the see of Bonfim.
  • As bishop of Ossory, Ireland, the Rev. Msgr. Dermot Pius Farrell, of the clergy of the diocese of Meath, currently vicar general and parish priest of Dunboyn

Bishop Ginés Ramón García Beltrán

Bishop Ginés Ramón García Beltrán was born on October 3, 1961 in Lorca, diocese of Cartagena. He attended the seminary of Almería, then based in Granada, obtaining a bachelor’s degree in theology from the faculty of theology of Granada in 1984. He graduated in canon law from the Pontifical Gregorian University in 1986.

He was ordained a priest on September 20, 1985 and was incardinated in the diocese of Almería. He has held the offices of parish priest of Santa María, Mojácar (1987-1989), vice rector of the minor seminary (1989-1992), rector of the San IndalecioTheological Institute (1991-1994), spiritual director of the minor seminary (1992-1993), parish priest of Santa María, Rioja (1993-1994), parish priest of Santa Maria de los Ángeles, Almería, and archpriest of the zone (1994-1996), episcopal delegate of the diocesan Synod (1996-1999), vicar general (1996-2005), canon of the cathedral (2003-2005), parish administrator and professor of the Centre of Theological Studies (2005-2009).

He was appointed as bishop of Guadix on December 3, 2009 and consecrated on February 27, 2010. In the Spanish Episcopal Conference he is a member of the Permanent Committee as President of the Episcopal Commission of Social Communications Media since March 12, 2014. He was previously a member of the same Commission, and also of the Heritage Commission (2010-2014). Since 2016 he has been a member of the Holy See Secretariat for Communication.

Bishop Francisco Canindé Palhano

Bishop Francisco Canindé Palhano was born January 1, 1949 in the city of São Hosé de Mipibu, in the archdiocese of Natal, State of Rio Grande do Norte.

After his elementary studies in the “São Pedro” seminary in the diocese of Natal, he studied letters at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte. He was then transferred to São Paulo where he completed his studies in philosophy and in theology at the “Nossa Senhora da Assunção”. Faculty of Theology. He also holds a licentiate in moral theology from the Alphonsianum Academy in Rome.

He was ordained a priest on February 2, 1975 and was incardinated in the archdiocese of Natal in which he held the following pastoral roles: parish vicar of “Sant’Ana” in Santana do Matos (1975); parish vicar of “Sant’Ana e São Joaquim” in São José de Mipibu (1975-1984); parish vicar of “Nossa Senhora do Ó” in Nísia Floresta (1984-1987); parish priest of “Santo Alfonso Maria de Ligório” in Natal (1987-2006); rector and professor of moral theology and liturgy at the “São Pedro” seminary of Natal (1995-2006); master of liturgical celebrations and member of the Committee for the XII National Eucharistic Congress (1991); vicar episcopal for Family Pastoral Ministry and ecclesiastical assistant of the movement ECC – “Encontro de Casais com Cristo”; and chaplain of the Marist College.

On July 26 he was appointed as diocesan vicar of Bonfim, receiving episcopal ordination the following October 21.

Bishop-elect Dermot Pius Farrell

Bishop-elect Dermot Pius Farrell was born in Castletown-Geoghegan, in the county of Westmeath, on November 22, 1954. He carried out his studies in theology at Saint Patrick College in Maynooth, obtaining a licentiate in Sacred Theology.

He was ordained a priest for the diocese of Meath on June 7, 1980.

After ordination he served as deputy priest of the Cathedral Church (1981-1985). He was then sent to Rome, where he obtained a doctorate in dogmatic theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University.

Upon returning to Ireland, he began to teach moral theology at Saint Patrick College in Maynooth, first becoming vice-president (1993-1996) and then president (1996-2007). On June 6, 2007 he was appointed as prelate of His Holiness.

From 2007 to the present, he has served as parish priest of Dunboyne, and since 2009, as vicar general of the diocese of Meath.

 

JF

Pope Tweets Peace Possibility

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 1:04 PM

In keeping with one of his key messages for the Christmas season, Pope Francis Tweeted on January 3, 2017, “In the name of Jesus, with our witness, we can prove that peace is possible.”

Twitter account Francis @Pontifex reached more than 40 million subscribers.  The Holy Father’s Tweets are issued in nine languages – about a third of the followers are English speakers.

In addition, Instagram @Francis — opened March 19, 2016 – has nearly five million followers.

 

JF

Poland: Pope Wishes the Country a Time of Peace and Hope

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 10:31 AM

On greeting the Polish pilgrims, present at the General Audience on January 3, 2018, Pope Francis wished Poland peace and hope.

At this first General Audience of the year, which was held in the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall, the Holy Father wished them “a Good Year.” He said to the Poles “May it be for you, for your families, for the persons you love, for those who live in Poland and abroad, for all your homeland, a time of peace, of realized hopes, charged with divine gifts and the protection of the Most Holy Mary, Mother of God.”

“May Christ, Strong God, Prince of Peace, born at Bethlehem, fill your hearts with His presence and bless you,” added the Pontiff.

Translation by Virginia M. Forrester

 

JF

Like Protagonists in the Bible, Let Divine Mercy Transform & Convert You

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 9:40 AM

Even if fearful or ashamed, ask sincere pardon for your sins to God and let His merciful gaze transform you, as he did many figures in the Bible.

Pope Francis stressed this during this morning’s General Audience in the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall, Jan. 3, 2018, as he continued his catechesis on the Holy Eucharist, and today considering the penitential rite.

In acknowledging our sinfulness in front of God and others, the rite intends to help dispose oneself to celebrate worthily the holy mysteries. The Pontiff reminded those gathered that the priest’s invitation is addressed to the whole community in prayer, because we are all sinners.

“What can the Lord give to one whose heart is already full of himself, of his success? Nothing, because one who is presumptuous is incapable of receiving forgiveness, satiated as he is with his presumed justice.”

Yet one who is aware of his miseries and lowers his eyes with humility, the Pope reminded, feels God’s merciful look resting on him, noting we know from experience that only one who is able to acknowledge his mistakes and asks for forgiveness, receives the understanding and forgiveness of others.

To listen in silence to the voice of conscience, the Holy Father continued, enables us to recognize that our thoughts are far from divine thoughts and that our words and our actions are often worldly.

Let God’s Merciful Gaze Rest on You

For this reason, at the beginning of the Mass, the Pope explained, we as a community carry out the penitential rite through a formula of general confession, pronounced in the first person singular. Each one confesses to God and to brethren to have sinned much in thoughts, words, deeds and omissions.

The words we say during the rite, the Pope reminded, are accompanied by the gesture of beating our breast, acknowledging that we sin out of our own fault, not that of others.

The Pope then warned against our tendency to often point our fingers at others, even if at times, out of fear or shame.

“I remember a story, which an old missionary told, of a woman who went to confession and began to tell the errors of her husband; then she went on to tell the errors of her mother-in-law and then the sins of neighbors.  At a certain point, the confessor said to her: ‘But, lady, tell me, have you finished?  — Very good: you have finished with others’ sins. Now begin to tell yours.’ We must tell our sins!”

“Sin,” the Pontiff underscored, “breaks: it breaks the relationship with God and it breaks the relationship with brethren, the relationship in the family, in society and in the community: Sin always breaks, separates, divides.”

Stop Pointing Fingers

After confessing our sin, the Argentine Pope reminded we beseech the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Angels and the Saints to pray to the Lord for us.

“Sacred Scripture offers us luminous examples of “penitent” figures that, looking into themselves after having committed a sin, find the courage to take off the mask and open themselves to the grace that renews the heart.” Some of these figures we can remember, he said, include King David, Saint Peter, the Prodigal Son or the Samaritan woman.

“To measure oneself with the frailty of the clay of which we are kneaded is an experience that strengthens us: while it makes us deal with our weakness, it opens the heart to invoke the Divine Mercy, which transforms and converts.”

Pope Francis concluded, reminding this is exactly what we do in the penitential rite at the beginning of Mass.

***

On Zenit’s Web page:

Full Text: https://zenit.org/articles/general-audience-on-the-penitential-act-full-text/

GENERAL AUDIENCE : On the Penitential Rite (FULL TEXT)

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 7:17 AM

This morning’s General Audience, the first of the year 2018, was held at 9:25 in Paul VI Hall, where the Holy Father Francis met with groups of pilgrims and faithful from Italy and from all over the world.

Continuing with the series of catecheses on the Holy Mass, in his address in Italian the Pope focused his meditation, which Zenit has translated in its entirety below, on the penitential rite.

After summarizing his catechesis in several languages, the Holy Father expressed special greetings to groups of faithful present.

The General Audience ended with the singing of the Pater Noster and the Apostolic Blessing.

* * *

The Holy Father’s Catechesis

Dear Brothers and Sisters, good morning!

Taking up the catecheses on the Eucharistic Celebration, today we reflect, in the context of the rites of introduction, on the penitential act. In its sobriety, it fosters the attitude with which to dispose oneself to celebrate worthily the holy mysteries, namely, acknowledging our sins before God and brethren; acknowledging that we are sinners. In fact, the priest’s invitation is addressed to the whole community in prayer, because we are all sinners. What can the Lord give to one whose heart is already full of himself, of his success? Nothing, because one who is presumptuous is incapable of receiving forgiveness, satiated as he is with his presumed justice. We think of the parable of the Pharisee and the publican, where only the latter – the publican —  goes home justified, namely, forgiven (Cf. Luke 18:9-14). One who is aware of his miseries and lowers his eyes with humility, feels God’s merciful look resting on him. We know from experience that only one who is able to acknowledge his mistakes and asks for forgiveness, receives the understanding and forgiveness of others.

To listen in silence to the voice of conscience enables us to recognize that our thoughts are far from divine thoughts, that our words and our actions are often worldly, guided, that is, by choices that are contrary to the Gospel. Therefore, at the beginning of the Mass, we carry out communally the penitential act through a formula of general confession, pronounced in the first person singular. Each one confesses to God and to brethren  “to have sinned much in thoughts, words, deeds and omissions.” Yes, also in omissions, namely, of having neglected to do the good that one could have done. Often we feel we are good because — we say — “I haven’t done wrong to any one.” In reality, it’s not enough not to have wronged our neighbor, we must choose to do good taking up occasions to give good witness that we are disciples of Jesus. It’s good to stress that we confess, be it to God or to brothers, that we are sinners: this helps us to understand the dimension of sin that, while it separates us from God, also divides us from our brethren and vice versa. Sin breaks: it breaks the relationship with God and it breaks the relationship with brethren, the relationship in the family, in society and in the community: Sin always breaks, separates, divides.

The words we say with the mouth are accompanied by the gesture of beating our breast, acknowledging that I have sinned by my own fault, and not that of others. It often happens in fact that, out of fear and shame, we point the finger to accuse others. It costs to admit that we are culpable, but it does us good to confess it sincerely, to confess our sins. I remember a story, which an old missionary told, of a woman who went to confession and began to tell the errors of her husband; then she went on to tell the errors of her mother-in-law and then the sins of neighbors.  At a certain point, the confessor said to her: “But, lady, tell me, have you finished?  — Very good: you have finished with others’ sins. Now begin to tell yours.” We must tell our sins!

After the confession of sin, we beseech the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Angels and the Saints to pray to the Lord for us. In this also, the communion of Saints is precious: namely, the intercession of these “friends and models of life” (Preface of November 12) sustains us in the journey towards full communion with God, when sin will be definitively annihilated.

Beyond the “I confess,” the penitential act can be done with other formulas, for instance: “Have mercy upon us, O Lord / We have sinned against you. / Show us thy steadfast love, O Lord. / And grant us thy salvation” (Cf. Psalm 123:3; 85:8; Jeremiah 14:20). Especially on Sunday, the blessing and the aspersion of water can be carried out in memory of our Baptism (Cf. OGMR, 51), which cancels all sins. And, as part of the penitential act, it’s also possible to sing the Kyrie eleison: with the ancient Greek expression, we acclaim the Lord – Kyrios – and implore His mercy (Ibid., 52).

Sacred Scripture offers us luminous examples of “penitent” figures that, looking into themselves after having committed a sin, find the courage to take off the mask and open themselves to the grace that renews the heart. We think of King David and of the words attributed to him in the Psalm: “Have mercy on me, O God, according to thy steadfast love; according to thy abundant mercy blot out my transgressions” (51:3). We think of the Prodigal Son who returns to the Father; or to the publican’s invocation: “God, be merciful to me a sinner” (Luke 18:13). We think also of Saint Peter, of Zacchaeus, of the Samaritan woman. To measure oneself with the frailty of the clay of which we are kneaded is an experience that strengthens us: while it makes us deal with our weakness, it opens the heart to invoke the divine mercy, which transforms and converts. And this is what we do in the penitential act at the beginning of the Mass.

[Original text: Italian]  [ZENIT’s translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

In Italian

To all the Italian-speaking pilgrims present in this first General Audience of 2018, I express warm wishes of hope and peace for the New Year.

I’m happy to receive the participants in the General Chapter of the Daughters of Mercy and of the Cross. I encourage you to promote your charism with a spirit of service and fidelity to the Church.

I greet the seminarians of the Consolata Missions Institute; the Prayer and Charity Family Membership of Agropoli and the parish groups, in particular those from Mozzo, from Belvedere di Tezze sul Brenta and from Sant’Arsenio.

A special thought goes to young people, the sick and newlyweds. In this New Year I invite you to receive and share every day the tenderness of God. Dear young people, be messengers of the love of Christ among your contemporaries; dear sick, find in God’s caress support in suffering; and you, dear newlyweds, be witnesses of the joy of the Sacrament of Marriage through your faithful and reciprocal love.

[Original text: Italian]  [ZENIT’s translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

Pope: ‘Repenting Makes Us Prepare Inwardly, Worthy to Celebrate Holy Mystery’

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 6:43 AM

“I give a warm welcome to the Arabic-speaking pilgrims, particularly those from Egypt, Lebanon and the Middle East!”, said Pope Francis during his General Audience of Jan. 3, 2018.

This morning’s General Audience was held at 9:30 in the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall where the Holy Father Francis met with groups of pilgrims and faithful from Italy and from all over the world.

The Pope spoke in Italian, translated immediately into Arabic by one of his collaborators in the Roman Curia: “Dear brothers and sisters, the penitential act we perform as a community at the beginning of the Mass, that is, recognizing our sins before God and our brothers and sisters, allows us to prepare ourselves inwardly to be worthy to celebrate this Holy Mystery.”

“He who confesses his sins with humility and sincerity, receives forgiveness and again finds union with God and with his brothers.”

Pope Francis concluded, praying: “May the Lord bless you and accompany you on the journey of the new year!”

Pope’s New Year’s Advice to Young, Newlyweds, and Sick

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 6:03 AM

“In this New Year, I invite you to welcome and share the tenderness of God every day.”

This was at the heart of Pope Francis’ New Year’s advice to young people, the sick, and newlyweds during his Jan. 3, 2018, General Audience in the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall, his first General Audience of 2018.

Saying he had something special to convey to the young people, the sick and newlyweds, the Holy Father gave the following recommendations.

“Dear young people, be messengers of Christ’s love among your peers.”

“Dear sick, find in the caress of God, support in your suffering.”

“And to you, dear newlyweds, be witnesses to the joy of the Sacrament of Marriage through your faithful and mutual love.”

DCL

‘Draw Near in Prayer to Christ,’ Urges Pope

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 5:50 AM

I greet all the English-speaking pilgrims and visitors taking part in today’s Audience, particularly those from Korea, Canada and the United States of America,” Pope Francis said on January 3, 2018, at his General Audience in Paul VI Hall at the Vatican, his first of the New Year.

“May each of you, and your families, cherish the joy of this Christmas season, and draw near in prayer to the Prince of Peace who has come to dwell among us. God bless you all!”

© Libreria Editrice Vatican

 

 

General Audience: Pope: ‘Let’s Acknowledge We Have Sinned’

Wed, 01/03/2018 - 12:37 AM

Here is the Vatican-provided English-language summary of the Pope’s address at the General Audience this morning:

***

Speaker:

Dear brothers and sisters: In our catechesis on the Holy Eucharist, today we consider the penitential rite. To prepare ourselves to celebrate worthily the sacred mysteries, we acknowledge, before God and our brothers and sisters, that we have sinned. Significantly, we make this confession as a community, yet in the Confiteor each of us speaks personally: “I confess… that I have sinned.” Like the humble publican in Jesus’ parable, we strike our breast and recognize that we are unworthy of the gift of God’s mercy and forgiveness. We then beg the intercession of Our Lady and all the angels and saints to sustain us on the path of holiness and conversion. The priest then pronounces the absolution – “May almighty God have mercy on us, forgive us our sins, and bring us to everlasting life”. Unlike the absolution granted in confession, this does not remit mortal sin, yet it expresses our trust in God’s promise of forgiveness and reconciliation. We thus join the great line of biblical figures – like David, the Prodigal Son and Saint Peter – who, conscious of their sin, acknowledged it before God with confidence in the transforming power of his grace.

 © Libreria Editrice Vaticana

Holy See Takes Leading Role on Migration and Refugees

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 1:08 PM

The Holy See expects to play a leading role in international efforts to address problems of migrants and refugees during 2018, according to Fr Michael Czerny is undersecretary of the Migrants and Refugees office at the Vatican Dicastery for Integral Human Development.

His comments came in a January 2, 2018, interview published by Vatican News. He referred to the Holy Father’s January 1, 2018, message for the 51st observance of World Day of Peace.

Fr Czerny said the message highlights how migrants and refugees are “not just people in difficulty, who need help but are “artisans of peace, contributors to peace, and builders of peace”.

Pope Francis said that peace is a “profound aspiration for everyone,” in his message. The Vatican released the text on November 24, 2017.

Peace is sought “for each individual and all peoples, and especially for those who most keenly suffer its absence.” The Holy Father said.  And he stressed: “I constantly keep in my thoughts and prayers, I would once again mention the over 250 million migrants worldwide, of whom 22.5 million are refugees.”

He called on the United Nations to take action on the migration issue during 2018, by creating two Global Compacts: one for safe, orderly and regular migration; and the other for refugees.

“As shared agreements at a global level, these compacts will provide a framework for policy proposals and practical measures,” Francis stated. “For this reason, they need to be inspired by compassion, foresight, and courage, so as to take advantage of every opportunity to advance the peace-building process. Only in this way can the realism required of international politics avoid surrendering to cynicism and to the globalization of indifference.”

Fr Czerny promised that the Vatican missions in New York and Geneva will be actively involved in negotiations leading to the global compacts: “What is very satisfying and hopeful and challenging is that many fellow states, nation-states, look to the Holy See for leadership in this area”.

Fr Michael’s office has worked with major Catholic refugee organizations and with bishops’ conferences to develop 20 action points, which are both “a pastoral plan” and “a negotiating platform”. He said they have been submitted to the UN for both the migrants and refugee processes and have been “warmly welcomed” as “quite outstanding contributions to the processes”.

 

 

 

 

 

L’Osservatore Romano’s Monthly: Women and Science

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 12:07 PM

Women and science is the theme of the January 2018 issue of L’Osservatore Romano’s monthly “Women, Church, World [“Donne, Chiesa, Mondo”], which highlights those women that dedicated themselves to science when “scientific learning was for centuries the almost exclusive prerogative of men.”

Despite their exclusion in fact, “those that left their mark, truly left it, not only from the scientific point of view but also from the human point of view, something that all scientific men were unable to do,” stresses the 40-page issue.

It’s only beginning in the second half of the 19th century that women began to be able to access higher learning, reads the text: before this time, they were distinguished more in humanist than in scientific disciplines.

So, history reports the name of “some tens of women of science in antiquity, only ten in the Middle Ages, especially nuns, almost none between 1400 and 1500, 16 in the 17th century, 24 in the 18th century <and> 108 in the 19th century.” Instead, in the 20th century, women’s contribution to the progress of science was “notable.”

The monthly features an interview with German Cathrin Brisken, known specialist in molecular oncology, portraits of Swedish physicist Lise Meitner (1878-1968), as well as of French chemist and physicist Marie Curie (1867-1934), her “extraordinary genius” and “the human sympathy she arouses.”

Discovered in the monthly also are the works of British Doctor Cicely Saunders (1918-2005), pioneer of palliative care, and of Canadian pharmacologist Frances Oldham (1914-2015), who fought for pregnant women, against the American marketing of the thalidomide tranquilizer.  The “saint of the month” is French Genevieve of Paris, spearhead of the resistance, through prayer, of the invasion of the Huns in the 5th century.

Translation by Virginia M. Forrester

 

JF

 

Pope Tweets for Peace

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 11:48 AM

Pope Francis started the New Year with Tweets of peace and the tenderness of God.

January 1, 2018: “Let us nurture the seeds of peace as they grow and let us transform our cities into workshops of peace.”

January 2, 2018: “In the simplicity of the nativity scene we encounter and contemplate the tenderness of God which reveals itself in the Baby Jesus.”

Twitter account Francis @Pontifex reached more than 40 million subscribers.  The Holy Father’s Tweets are issued in nine languages – about a third of the followers are English speakers.

In addition, Instagram @Francis — opened March 19, 2016 – has nearly five million followers.

 

JF

Pope’s January Prayer Intentions: Religious Minorities in Asia

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 11:33 AM

“That Christians, and other religious minorities in Asian countries, may be able to practice,” is the prayer intention of Pope Francis for January 2018, promoted throughout the world by the Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network.

The Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network addresses the challenges facing humanity and assists the mission of the Church. We pray and work to meet the challenges of the world identified by the Pope in his monthly intentions, while walking a spiritual path called the “Way of the Heart.” |

The following prayer in support of this month’s intention is based on public comments of Pope Francis on the Feast of St. Stephen in 2016:

By choosing the truth, Christ became at the same time the victim of the mystery of evil present in the world – but He has conquered… Today the Church is experiencing severe persecution in different places, up to the supreme test of martyrdom… How many of our brothers and sisters in faith suffer abuse, violence, and are hated because of Jesus… We want to think about them and be close to them with our affection, our prayer, and also our tears.

When we read the history of the early centuries, here in Rome, we read about so much cruelty towards Christians. There is this same cruelty today, and in greater numbers with Christians. In making space within our heart to the Son of God… let us renew the joyous and courageous willingness to follow him faithfully as our only guide, persevering in living according to the mind of the Gospel and refusing the mentality of the rulers of this world. Amen. – Father Blazek SJ

Reverencing the Altar at the Liturgy of the Hours

Tue, 01/02/2018 - 12:00 AM

Answered by Legionary of Christ Father Edward McNamara, professor of liturgy and dean of theology at the Regina Apostolorum university.

Q: According to the Ceremonial of Bishops, No. 73, when the bishop presides at a solemn celebration of vespers or morning prayer, he kisses the altar at the beginning and, as circumstances suggest, at the end. [Liturgist] Peter Elliott extends this to all celebrants and deacons. Is that correct? — T.S., Aberdeen, Scotland

A: What now Bishop Peter Elliott says in his important work Ceremonies of the Modern Roman Rite is the following when addressing the question of the liturgy of the hours:

“… Having made the customary reverence, the celebrant and his assistant deacon(s) or priests go up to the altar and kiss it. Then they go to the presidential chair.”

I would agree with Bishop Elliott that this is the correct procedure. Also, although he does not address the issue as such, I would say that it would be the same if a deacon presides at vespers in the absence of a priest.

The reason for possible doubt is precisely the dearth of clear instructions regarding the initial part of the office in Chapter 5 of the General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours, Nos. 254-266.

This difficulty of lack of precision was also present in the first editions of the new missal.

In fact, the detailed descriptions found in the Ceremonial of Bishops were an attempt to remedy this and to find a middle way between the meticulous rubrics of the extraordinary form and the overly generic ones of the more recent liturgical books.

In this way the Ceremonial of Bishops, while retaining its primary characteristic as a book for bishops, would provide sound guidance for priests in doubtful cases not clear in the other books.

This was not always appreciated. Many years ago I was privileged with access to a document from the archives of the discussion surrounding the preparation and approval of the Ceremonial of Bishops in the 1970s. One prelate criticized the book as being redolent of a pre-Vatican II mentality, another, the cardinal archbishop of Krakow, Karol Wojtyla, defended it as a necessary document as there was much confusion regarding these themes.

Because of the clarifying function of the Ceremonial of Bishop it is widely used by liturgists to address questions left unanswered in other sources. This, I presume, is why Bishop Elliott proposes the legitimacy of extending the bishops’ norms to the priest. As I mentioned, I agree on this point.

The most recent edition of the Roman Missal has far clearer rubrics and is thus the primary source with respect to the Mass. In cases where the norms of the missal differ slightly from those of the ceremonial, the missal has precedence except when dealing with something that is exclusive to the functions of the bishop.

For example, following the publication of the ceremonial many priests would remain seated while putting incense in the thurible and blessing the deacon as indicated in the ceremonial. The missal is silent on this point.

However, it had been customary that only a bishop would sit while preforming certain ceremonies, and thus the third edition has indirectly clarified that priests should stand for these functions.

It does so in two moments:

“131. After this, all rise, and the Alleluia or other chant is sung as the liturgical time requires (cf. nos. 62-64). …

“212. During the Liturgy of the Word, the concelebrants remain at their places, sitting or standing whenever the principal celebrant does. When the Alleluia is begun, all rise, except for a Bishop, who puts incense into the thurible without saying anything and blesses the Deacon or, in the absence of a Deacon, the concelebrant who is to proclaim the Gospel. However, in a concelebration where a Priest presides, the concelebrant who in the absence of a Deacon proclaims the Gospel neither requests nor receives the blessing of the principal celebrant.”

Given that the expression “all rise” means all, and that the exception mentioned about the bishop is one of the very few times something specific to the bishop is mentioned in the GIRM, I surmise that this was an intentional clarification of the proper posture of the priest at this moment. If it were intended that the priest remain seated, No. 131 would indicate it.

With respect to the Divine Office, the Ceremonial of Bishops is still of essential value as there have been relatively few clarifications of the ceremonial aspects since its publication.

* * *

Readers may send questions to zenit.liturgy@gmail.com. Please put the word “Liturgy” in the subject field. The text should include your initials, your city and your state, province or country. Father McNamara can only answer a small selection of the great number of questions that arrive.

World Day of Peace: Pope Thanks Participants

Mon, 01/01/2018 - 11:42 AM

Pope Francis thanked participants in various initiatives for today’s World Day of Peace in remarks following the praying of the Angelus in St. Peter’s Square on January 2, 2018.

Message for World Day of Peace

“I express my appreciation for the many initiatives of prayer and actions for peace, organized throughout the world, on the occasion of today’s World Day of Peace,” the Holy Father said. “I’m thinking, in particular, of the National March held yesterday evening at Sotto il Monte, promoted by CEI [Italian Episcopal Conference], Italian Caritas, Pax Christi and Catholic Action. And I greet the participants in the ‘Peace in All Lands’ manifestation, promoted in Rome and in many countries by Sant’Egidio Community. Dear friends, I encourage you to go forward joyfully in your commitment of solidarity, especially in the peripheries of cities, to foster peaceful coexistence”

© Libreria Editrice Vatican

[Original text: Italian] [ZENIT’s translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

 

JF

Pope Francis: Fix Gaze on Mary

Mon, 01/01/2018 - 11:29 AM

Pope Francis reminded the 40,000 visitors in St. Peter’s Square to keep their gaze fixed on Mary, during his address before praying the Angelus on January 1, 2018. “Let us fix our gaze on her, to take up again, under her maternal protection, the journey along the paths of time,” he urged.

He also reminded listeners that on this “World Day of Peace” he wishes to be a voice of the migrants and refugees, “these our brothers and sisters, who invoke for their future a horizon of peace. ”  He cited his message for the 2018 peace observance in which he called on the United Nations to take action on the migration issue during 2018, by creating two Global Compacts: one for safe, orderly and regular migration; and the other for refugees.

“As Mother, Mary carries out a very special function: she puts herself between her Son Jesus and men in the reality of their privations, indigence, and sufferings,” the Holy Father explained. “Mary intercedes, as at Cana, aware that, as Mother, she can, rather, must make present to her Son the needs of men, especially the weakest and most disadvantaged.

“It’s in fact to these persons that the theme is dedicated of the World Day of Peace that we celebrate today: ‘Migrants and Refugees: Men and Women in Search of Peace,’ so is the motto of this Day.”

The Pope concluded by encouraging those listening in the square and around the world by video and radio not to extinguish hope in the hearts of those migrants and workers: “It’s important that, on the part of all — civil institutions, educational, welfare, and ecclesial realities, there is the commitment to ensure to refugees, to migrants and to all a future of peace. ”

* * *

The Pope Address Before the Angelus

 Dear Brothers and Sisters, good morning!

On the first page of the calendar of the New Year, which the Lord gives us, the Church puts as stupendous miniature the liturgical solemnity of Mary Most Holy, Mother of God. On this first day of the solar year, let us fix our gaze on her, to take up again, under her maternal protection, the journey along the paths of time.

Today’s Gospel (Cf. Luke 2:16-21) takes us back to the stable of Bethlehem. The shepherds arrive in haste and find Mary, Joseph, and the Child, and refer to the proclamation given to them by the Angels, namely, that that Newborn is the Saviour. All are astonished, while “Mary kept all these things, pondering them in her heart” (v. 19). The Virgin makes us understand how the event of Christmas is to be received: not superficially but in the heart. She indicates the true way to receive God’s gift: to keep it in the heart and ponder it. It’s an invitation addressed to each one of us to pray, contemplating and enjoying this gift that is Jesus Himself.

It’s through Mary that the Son of God assumes corporeity. However, Mary’s maternity isn’t reduced to this: thanks to her faith, she is the first disciple of Jesus and this “dilates” her maternity. It was Mary’s faith that at Cana caused the first miraculous “sign,” which contributed to arouse the disciples’ faith. Mary is present with the same faith at the foot of the cross and receives as son the Apostle John. And, finally, after the Resurrection, she becomes the praying Mother of the Church, on which the Holy Spirit descends powerfully on the Day of Pentecost.

As Mother, Mary carries out a very special function: she puts herself between her Son Jesus and men in the reality of their privations, indigence, and sufferings. Mary intercedes, as at Cana, aware that, as Mother, she can, rather, must make present to her Son the needs of men, especially the weakest and most disadvantaged. It’s in fact to these persons that the theme is dedicated of the World Day of Peace that we celebrate today: “Migrants and Refugees: Men and Women in Search of Peace,” so is the motto of this Day. Once again, I wish to make myself a voice of these our brothers and sisters, who invoke for their future a horizon of peace. For this peace, which is a right of all, many of them are prepared to risk their life in a journey that in most cases is long and dangerous; they are willing to face toils and sufferings (Cf. Message for the 2018 World Day of Peace, 1).

Please, let’s not extinguish the hope in their heart; let’s not suffocate their expectations of peace! It’s important that, on the part of all — civil institutions, educational, welfare, and ecclesial realities, there is the commitment to ensure to refugees, to migrants and to all a future of peace. May the Lord grant us to work in this New Year with generosity, with generosity, to bring about a more solidary and hospitable world. I invite you to pray for this, while together with you I entrust to Mary, Mother of God and our Mother, the <year> 2018 that has just begun. The old Russian monks, mystics, said that in times of spiritual turbulence it is necessary to recollect oneself under the mantle of the Holy Mother of God. Thinking of the many turbulences of today, and especially of migrants and refugees, we pray as they taught us to pray: “We seek refuge under your protection, Holy Mother of God: do not disdain the entreaties of us who are in trial, but deliver us from every danger, O glorious and Blessed Virgin. “

© Libreria Editrice Vatican

[Original text: Italian]  [ZENIT’s translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

 

 

Angelus Address: On the Solemnity of the Mother of God and the World Day of Peace

Mon, 01/01/2018 - 11:02 AM

VATICAN CITY, JANUARY 1, 2018 (Zenit.org).- Here is a ZENIT translation of the address Pope Francis gave today, before and after praying the midday Angelus with those gathered in St. Peter’s Square.

* * *

Before the Angelus:

 Dear Brothers and Sisters, good morning!

On the first page of the calendar of the New Year, which the Lord gives us, the Church puts as stupendous miniature the liturgical solemnity of Mary Most Holy, Mother of God. On this first day of the solar year, let us fix our gaze on her, to take up again, under her maternal protection, the journey along the paths of time.

Today’s Gospel (Cf. Luke 2:16-21) takes us back to the stable of Bethlehem. The shepherds arrive in haste and find Mary, Joseph, and the Child, and refer to the proclamation given to them by the Angels, namely, that that Newborn is the Saviour. All are astonished, while “Mary kept all these things, pondering them in her heart” (v. 19). The Virgin makes us understand how the event of Christmas is to be received: not superficially but in the heart. She indicates the true way to receive God’s gift: to keep it in the heart and ponder it. It’s an invitation addressed to each one of us to pray, contemplating and enjoying this gift that is Jesus Himself.

It’s through Mary that the Son of God assumes corporeity. However, Mary’s maternity isn’t reduced to this: thanks to her faith, she is the first disciple of Jesus and this “dilates” her maternity. It was Mary’s faith that at Cana caused the first miraculous “sign,” which contributed to arouse the disciples’ faith. Mary is present with the same faith at the foot of the cross and receives as son the Apostle John. And, finally, after the Resurrection, she becomes the praying Mother of the Church, on which the Holy Spirit descends powerfully on the Day of Pentecost.

As Mother, Mary carries out a very special function: she puts herself between her Son Jesus and men in the reality of their privations, indigence, and sufferings. Mary intercedes, as at Cana, aware that, as Mother, she can, rather, must make present to her Son the needs of men, especially the weakest and most disadvantaged. It’s in fact to these persons that the theme is dedicated of the World Day of Peace that we celebrate today: “Migrants and Refugees: Men and Women in Search of Peace,” so is the motto of this Day. Once again, I wish to make myself voice of these our brothers and sisters, who invoke for their future a horizon of peace. For this peace, which is a right of all, many of them are prepared to risk their life in a journey that in most cases is long and dangerous; they are willing to face toils and sufferings (Cf. Message for the 2018 World Day of Peace, 1).

Please, let’s not extinguish the hope in their heart; let’s not suffocate their expectations of peace! It’s important that, on the part of all — civil institutions, educational, welfare, and ecclesial realities, there is the commitment to ensure to refugees, to migrants and to all a future of peace. May the Lord grant us to work in this New Year with generosity, with generosity, to bring about a more solidary and hospitable world. I invite you to pray for this, while together with you I entrust to Mary, Mother of God and our Mother, the <year> 2018 that has just begun. The old Russian monks, mystics, said that in times of spiritual turbulence it is necessary to recollect oneself under the mantle of the Holy Mother of God. Thinking of the many turbulences of today, and especially of migrants and refugees, we pray as they taught us to pray: “We seek refuge under your protection, Holy Mother of God: do not disdain the entreaties of us who are in trial, but deliver us from every danger, O glorious and Blessed Virgin. “

© Libreria Editrice Vatican

[Original text: Italian]  [ZENIT’s translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

 

 After the Angelus:

 Dear Brothers and Sisters,

On the threshold of 2018, my warm wish goes to all of you for every good in the New Year.

I wish to thank the President of the Italian Republic for his good wishes to me yesterday evening in his end of the year Message, which I return from my heart, wishing for the Italian people a year of serenity and peace, illumined by God’s constant blessing.

I express my appreciation for the many initiatives of prayer and actions for peace, organized throughout the world, on the occasion of today’s World Day of Peace. I’m thinking, in particular, of the National March held yesterday evening at Sotto il Monte, promoted by CEI [Italian Episcopal Conference], Italian Caritas, Pax Christi and Catholic Action. And I greet the participants in the “Peace in All Lands” manifestation, promoted in Rome and in many countries by Sant’Egidio Community. Dear friends, I encourage you to go forward joyfully in your commitment of solidarity, especially in the peripheries of cities, to foster peaceful coexistence.

My greeting goes to you dear pilgrims present here, in particular, those of New York, the musical band from California and the “Pro Loco” group of Massalengo.

I renew to all good wishes for a year of peace in the Lord’s grace and with the maternal protection of Mary, the Holy Mother of God. Have a good year, a good lunch and don’t forget to pray for me. Goodbye!

© Libreria Editrice Vatican

[Original text: Italian]  [ZENIT’s translation by Virginia M. Forrester]

 

 JF